Sunday, 23rd of July 2017

Sunday, 23rd of July 2017

DutchKast

In 2005 the Society of Colonial Wars in the State of New Jersey presented a rare and valuable antique kast (from the Dutch word kasten meaning "cupboard") to Morven Museum & Garden in Princeton. Used for storing linens and clothing, kasts were made in the Dutch colonial regions of New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut from the mid-1600s into the early-1800s. The kast is located in the reception room, on the immediate-right as one enters the museum.

Made of Sweetgum and secondary woods, the kast is thought to have been made between 1700 and 1750. Its construction, especially the applied mahogany decoration and double-fielded door panel, is common to a type originating in Long Island and later transported to New Jersey. The right door is incised with the letters "IA", possibly the initials of the maker or an owner.

Morven Museum & Garden occupies the house called Morven, the former New Jersey Governor’s Mansion and eighteenth century home of Richard Stockton, a signer of the Declaration of Independence, and several generations of his descendants. Its restoration and conversion to a museum were completed in 2004. The kast was the first example of a Dutch-influenced colonial antique in Morven's permanent collection.